Books & Blogs

/Books & Blogs
Books & Blogs 2017-11-26T16:00:44+00:00

The Dolphin Parent

PURCHASE ON AMAZON

The Self-Motivated Kid

PURCHASE ON AMAZON

The Dolphin Way

Chinese Edition

With insight, professional expertise and unfailing instinct, Dr. Shimi Kang offers us essential guidance in restoring sanity to 21st Century parenting. Compassionate to parent and child, loving and reasoned in its approach, The Dolphin Way™ is highly readable, emotionally nurturing and intellectually satisfying

Gabor Mate M.D., Co-Author, Hold On To Your Kids: Why Parents Need To Matter More Than Peers

“This is a powerful book that not only reminds us of what it means to live a balanced human life, but also how to achieve it–simply and naturally. The Dolphin Way™ guides us towards balance in an often imbalanced world.”

David Suzuki

Ready to give your kids back their childhood—the part YOU loved? The joy? The creativity? The afternoons you still remember with such longing? If you’re driving your kid to the lessons neither of you likes, instead of giving yourselves BOTH a chance to relax, play or just ‘waste’ time, it’s time to turn around the car. This book is your U-turn to joy

Lenore Skenazy, founder of the book and blog Free-Range Kids

“In The Dolphin Way™, Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of THE WONDER OF BOYS and THE WONDER OF GIRLS

“The Dolphin Way™ is a beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself. It is full of compelling case histories and common-sense prescriptions for parenting in today’s world. Although Dr. Kang and I don’t agree on everything, we agree on most of what is in this book.”

Peter Gray, research professor of psychology, Boston College, and author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their their internal motivation and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult work – read this book! Using concrete evidence, Dr. Kang shows why “Tiger” approaches to parenting do more harm than good. Her Dolphin approach will have you and your kids cheering. Highly recommended!

Amy McCready, Founder of PositiveParentingSolutions.com and author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time...The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling

“What a wonderful contribution to the emerging evolution of conscious parenting! An encyclopedia of research and insights to help parents navigate their parenting journeys!”

Dr. Shefali Tsabary, author of The Conscious Parent and Out of Control

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Your Content Goes Here, Library Journal (starred review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

“This book really opened my eyes to the idea that balance in parenting is as important as balance in life. Dr. Kang uses evidence-based research to make her points about the importance of being an authoritative parent. I feel like this book has made me understand much better the kind of parent that I want to be and I know that it will very dog-eared from all my referencing as my son grows up.”

Your Content Goes Here, SavvyMom.ca

Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of The Wonder of Boys and The Wonder of Girls

A beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself.”

Peter Gray, Author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

“If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their internal motivation, and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult world—read this book!”

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Library Journal, (Starred Review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

Blog

Social-Emotional Learning: a New Dimension of Education

“MASON” WAS A HIGH achiever and a dream student in any school.

By grade 10, Mason, whose name has been changed to protect his privacy, was consistently on the honor roll and a top athlete. He was known to be driven, hardworking and responsible. So it was shocking to all who knew him when he was caught plagiarizing an essay – submitting a paper he’d found online as his own work.

Since this seriously violated school policy, Mason was suspended. He was flooded with feelings of shame, anxiety, depression and self-hatred. The revelation and suspension resulted in Mason losing his place on a school sports team. This lead to further social isolation, and he became angry with his school for “dumping” him and not recognizing his “worth.” He began to lash out at coaches and team members, inflamed his parents against the school administration and retreated into further uncontrolled internet use.

Digital citizenship is a cornerstone of 21st century education. However, digital citizenship encompasses much more than adept web surfing or social media nimbleness. It transcends simple expertise. In its ideal form, digital citizenship fosters literacy, communication and responsibility. It doesn’t even require the presence of cellphones in the classroom, as exemplified by […]

By | October 30th, 2018|

How to Manage Technology Use in Your Home

AS SOCIETY HAS progressed, many of us have swapped physical interaction for online interaction and daylight for artificially emitted blue light – including our children. We’re seeing toddlers with faces glued to smartphones and tablets, and as kids reach school age, they’re often encouraged to spend time on iPads and other devices to do schoolwork.

But what does this mean? What are the potential side effects? How much screen time is too much?

Research findings suggest that blue light can impact sleep patterns, social media use is linked with anxiety, depression and body image symptoms, and internet addiction disorder has become a medical diagnosis in Europe. In addition, there is no arguing that every minute you or your child is staring at a screen is a minute you’re not doing important social and emotional activities such as making eye contact, having real spontaneous conversations, moving your bodies, getting sunlight or playing outside.

To better manage technology use in your home, here are a few of my favorite tips:

Minimize technology during family time.

Earlier this year, University of British Columbia researchers presented very interesting findings at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s annual convention in Atlanta. […]

By | August 4th, 2018|

Resiliency A Skill Being Touted As Taught At Youth Summer Camps

Summer camp has always meant facing a certain amount of challenges – mosquitos, making new friends, learning to play new sports and games.

In other words, it’s an opportunity for kids to become more resilient. Over the past several years, resiliency – being able to withstand difficulties and rise to the occasion when necessary – has become one of the qualities parents want most for their children, as most of us have come to believe that the coddled children of helicopter parents won’t make it far in this world.

Books on resiliency have been churned out by the dozens. Research institutes have been founded to study it. Child psychologists actively promote its benefits.No wonder camps across the country have begun to tout their resiliency-building benefits.

It’s a great sales pitch. But how do camps do it? Teaching kids archery or to ride a bike, or most any other classic camp activity for that matter, seems fairly straightforward, whereas teaching resilience can be more difficult to understand. Directors and counsellors at four camps in Canada that promote their resiliency-building benefits share how they go about doing it, helping to make not only happy campers, but ones who come home ready to rise to the […]

By | August 4th, 2018|

Stress and the Gender Gap

In honour of April’s Stress Awareness month, I wanted to take this time to touch upon a subject that many women of the 21st century are struggling with in silence, day after day, whether they are aware of it or not. During this month, many experts in all fields of health will come together in hopes of spreading awareness and increasing public understanding of this growing issue that is seemingly harmless and often overlooked. Because for many of us, we may not realize its creeping effects on our health until we fall extremely ill, or it is too late. And in an increasingly complex and competitive world where studies have shown that women are more affected by this today and in bigger numbers than ever before in history, we need to ask ourselves when is enough, enough? And what can we do about it?

Just less than 200 years ago, the biggest trials women were faced with were that of fighting for their […]

By | November 20th, 2017|

Workplace Bullying: A Real Issue That Needs a Real Solution

Tigertown is a pushing, demanding, and stifling workplace. The hours are long, the management is predatory, the employees are solitary, and there is little community — definitely no mentors, and no time for fun or collegial bonding. Tigertown is an incubator for an insidiously growing problem: workplace bullying.

Although school-based bullying in children and youth has achieved much attention over the years, adults bully all the time and in surprising places. Universities, hospitals, schools, corporations, and even the police force are all settings where the real, common, and shockingly increasing problem of workplace bullying is occurring.

A new report by the Conference Board of Canada called Workplace Bullying Primer: What Is It and How to Deal With It describes the growing problem of workplace bullying.

As expected, the most common type of workplace bullying is “top-down” bullying where a superior bullies an employee. However, lateral (peer to peer) and bottom up (employee bullies superior) can certainly also occur. Perhaps one surprising (or not so surprising) finding is that the major means of workplace bullying is email. Email is ubiquitous but it can be […]

By | November 20th, 2017|
Load More Posts