Books & Blogs

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Books & Blogs 2017-11-26T16:00:44+00:00

The Dolphin Parent

PURCHASE ON AMAZON

The Self-Motivated Kid

PURCHASE ON AMAZON

The Dolphin Way

Chinese Edition

With insight, professional expertise and unfailing instinct, Dr. Shimi Kang offers us essential guidance in restoring sanity to 21st Century parenting. Compassionate to parent and child, loving and reasoned in its approach, The Dolphin Way™ is highly readable, emotionally nurturing and intellectually satisfying

Gabor Mate M.D., Co-Author, Hold On To Your Kids: Why Parents Need To Matter More Than Peers

“This is a powerful book that not only reminds us of what it means to live a balanced human life, but also how to achieve it–simply and naturally. The Dolphin Way™ guides us towards balance in an often imbalanced world.”

David Suzuki

Ready to give your kids back their childhood—the part YOU loved? The joy? The creativity? The afternoons you still remember with such longing? If you’re driving your kid to the lessons neither of you likes, instead of giving yourselves BOTH a chance to relax, play or just ‘waste’ time, it’s time to turn around the car. This book is your U-turn to joy

Lenore Skenazy, founder of the book and blog Free-Range Kids

“In The Dolphin Way™, Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of THE WONDER OF BOYS and THE WONDER OF GIRLS

“The Dolphin Way™ is a beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself. It is full of compelling case histories and common-sense prescriptions for parenting in today’s world. Although Dr. Kang and I don’t agree on everything, we agree on most of what is in this book.”

Peter Gray, research professor of psychology, Boston College, and author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their their internal motivation and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult work – read this book! Using concrete evidence, Dr. Kang shows why “Tiger” approaches to parenting do more harm than good. Her Dolphin approach will have you and your kids cheering. Highly recommended!

Amy McCready, Founder of PositiveParentingSolutions.com and author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time...The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling

“What a wonderful contribution to the emerging evolution of conscious parenting! An encyclopedia of research and insights to help parents navigate their parenting journeys!”

Dr. Shefali Tsabary, author of The Conscious Parent and Out of Control

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Your Content Goes Here, Library Journal (starred review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

“This book really opened my eyes to the idea that balance in parenting is as important as balance in life. Dr. Kang uses evidence-based research to make her points about the importance of being an authoritative parent. I feel like this book has made me understand much better the kind of parent that I want to be and I know that it will very dog-eared from all my referencing as my son grows up.”

Your Content Goes Here, SavvyMom.ca

Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of The Wonder of Boys and The Wonder of Girls

A beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself.”

Peter Gray, Author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

“If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their internal motivation, and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult world—read this book!”

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Library Journal, (Starred Review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

Blog

For the Sake of Our Kids’ Mental Health, We Must Teach Them to Innovate

“Sam” – whose real name I’m not using to protect his privacy – was a first-year college student when he was referred to me. He was taking English and music, and he had slashed his arms with the bow of his violin.

He told me it was not a suicide attempt but rather a protest against his childhood.

Sam told me that as a child, he was a star student, excelling in academics and music, as he spent a lot of time in those activities. However, after Sam reached a certain level of technical ability, he started to fall behind. Around grade 11, the emphasis in the classroom shifted more toward comprehension, creative writing, music composition and group projects, and thus, Sam barely made it into college. Once in college, things became much worse, and Sam admitted to me that he slashed his arms after he was caught cheating on an English essay that he just couldn’t “figure out on his own.”

[See: 10 Concerns Parents Have About Their Kids’ Health.]

Sam’s story is not unique. […]

By | November 20th, 2017|

Why We Need Social and Emotional Learning in Schools

When “Tyler” was a child, he was anxious.

He may have inherited his tendency to worry from his mom, who was obsessed with “what ifs” and what others thought. Or maybe it was his father, who pushed him hard in school and extracurricular activities. Whatever the case, his parents often tried to solve his problems for him, which greatly diminished his ability to cope with adversity as an adolescent.

By age 19, Tyler – a patient of mine whose name I changed to protect his privacy – was failing his college courses and became withdrawn from family and friends. His parents urged him to seek help, which led to his diagnosis of depression. Personal counseling sessions helped Tyler learn positive coping strategies and how to better deal with uncertainty, independently problem-solve, regulate his emotions and live a balanced life.

[See: 10 Concerns Parents Have About Their Kids’ Health.]

The Child Mind Institute reports that half of all mental illness occurs before the age of 14 and 75 percent by the age of 24. Many suffer […]

By | November 20th, 2017|

Why Parents Need to Talk to Their Kids About Porn

As a psychiatrist specializing in teens and young adults, I bear witness to an alarming and insidious toxin that has increased in potency over the 15 years of my practice: online pornography. Though often dismissed as harmless, pornography has had a devastating impact on the well-being of many of my patients, and it can affect a person’s mental, physical and social health.

By age 15, children are more likely than not to have seen online pornography, according to an extensive study of adolescents in the UK by Middlesex University. These young people were as likely to find pornography by accident as to find it deliberately. However, 46 percent of the 1,001 children and young people studied reported searching […]

By | January 16th, 2017|

Anxiety and the Importance of Play

First off, please tell us a little bit about you – your background, your family, your personal mission and what led you to it.

My personal mission is to spread the message that a balanced lifestyle with enough play, social connection, and downtime is vital for human health. My work as a psychiatrist and research in addiction and motivation combined with my experiences as a mom of three kids – ages six, nine, and 11 – led me to this goal. I’m the current medical director of child and youth mental health for the city of Vancouver, and clinical associate professor at the University of British Columbia.

Did you ever attend camp? Have any of your children attended camp?

[…]

By | January 16th, 2017|

How To Set, Achieve And Sustain Goals

Most of us have probably been there. You say to yourself “today is when I finally stop putting things off” or “this is when I shed those extra pounds.” Perhaps it was, “I’m going to stop buying those things I don’t need and climb out of debt” or “quit smoking” or even “wasting time on the Internet.” We start off with the best intentions and feel committed when we set these goals for an improved self, or else we probably wouldn’t bother.

You may have had a solid start. You gave up the after-dinner sweets. Maybe you cancelled and cut up your credit cards or tossed your cigarette pack in the garbage. You may even have installed a website blocker to keep you on task while online.

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But then you lapse after a rough day at work, an argument with your spouse, or head out on a carefree vacation. What you chalked […]

By | December 28th, 2016|
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