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Books & Blogs 2017-11-26T16:00:44+00:00

The Dolphin Parent

PURCHASE ON AMAZON

The Self-Motivated Kid

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The Dolphin Way

Chinese Edition

With insight, professional expertise and unfailing instinct, Dr. Shimi Kang offers us essential guidance in restoring sanity to 21st Century parenting. Compassionate to parent and child, loving and reasoned in its approach, The Dolphin Way™ is highly readable, emotionally nurturing and intellectually satisfying

Gabor Mate M.D., Co-Author, Hold On To Your Kids: Why Parents Need To Matter More Than Peers

“This is a powerful book that not only reminds us of what it means to live a balanced human life, but also how to achieve it–simply and naturally. The Dolphin Way™ guides us towards balance in an often imbalanced world.”

David Suzuki

Ready to give your kids back their childhood—the part YOU loved? The joy? The creativity? The afternoons you still remember with such longing? If you’re driving your kid to the lessons neither of you likes, instead of giving yourselves BOTH a chance to relax, play or just ‘waste’ time, it’s time to turn around the car. This book is your U-turn to joy

Lenore Skenazy, founder of the book and blog Free-Range Kids

“In The Dolphin Way™, Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of THE WONDER OF BOYS and THE WONDER OF GIRLS

“The Dolphin Way™ is a beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself. It is full of compelling case histories and common-sense prescriptions for parenting in today’s world. Although Dr. Kang and I don’t agree on everything, we agree on most of what is in this book.”

Peter Gray, research professor of psychology, Boston College, and author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their their internal motivation and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult work – read this book! Using concrete evidence, Dr. Kang shows why “Tiger” approaches to parenting do more harm than good. Her Dolphin approach will have you and your kids cheering. Highly recommended!

Amy McCready, Founder of PositiveParentingSolutions.com and author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time...The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling

“What a wonderful contribution to the emerging evolution of conscious parenting! An encyclopedia of research and insights to help parents navigate their parenting journeys!”

Dr. Shefali Tsabary, author of The Conscious Parent and Out of Control

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Your Content Goes Here, Library Journal (starred review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

“This book really opened my eyes to the idea that balance in parenting is as important as balance in life. Dr. Kang uses evidence-based research to make her points about the importance of being an authoritative parent. I feel like this book has made me understand much better the kind of parent that I want to be and I know that it will very dog-eared from all my referencing as my son grows up.”

Your Content Goes Here, SavvyMom.ca

Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of The Wonder of Boys and The Wonder of Girls

A beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself.”

Peter Gray, Author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

“If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their internal motivation, and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult world—read this book!”

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Library Journal, (Starred Review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

Blog

Superficial and Sexual Stereotypes

Sex and gender are clearly common topics for societal issues. Unfortunately, it is not always a positive conversation. Signs of a hypersexual, gender-stereotyped culture clearly pop out with a quick scan of recent news headlines. We see gender insults in the current presidential campaign, deep concern about the presence of rape culture on college campuses, judicial blocking of gender-neutral bathrooms in schools, and backlash to the UN’s appointment of Wonder Woman as the honorary ambassador for women and girls.

The Gender Gap Index quantifies the magnitude of gender-based imbalances of nations using economic, political, education and health criteria. It is designed to create greater awareness of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them. Fortunately, North America has closed 70 percent of its gender gap since the World Economic Forum first introduced the Global Gender Gap Index in 2006 as a framework for capturing the magnitude of gender-based disparities. While Canada and the United States have made […]

By | November 1st, 2016|

Online Pornography And Sexual Imagery Hurts Young Minds

Just a few weeks earlier, Jesse was excited to start grade five and share with his friends all the good stories he had from summer camp and playing baseball. But this past week, Jesse's father noticed his son's behaviour was changing quite dramatically. Usually eager to share what he was learning in math and science, Jesse gave a simple shrug of his shoulders and said, "It was pretty boring to be honest, Mom" when asked how the class science experiment went.

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Figuring he was just in a bad mood that evening, Jesse's father waited until the weekend to ask how he was enjoying getting to know his new classmates. Even more telling that something was seriously wrong, Jesse responded, "Michael acts like a $#*&!!"

This withdrawn attitude and profanity came as a complete to shock to Jesse's parents. Where had their son heard this kind of language? Why was he […]

By | October 13th, 2016|

3 Science-Based Strategies For A Successful School Year

With the official end of summer and start of school, come changes to routines, new schedules, and certain adjustments. This sudden change of pace for families can sometimes leave parents feeling like they are performing a difficult juggling act!

While some children will be excited to see all their friends together again, others may groan at the thought of recess being their only time during the day to play. Still, each young person is hopefully commencing a school year filled with tremendous personal growth and learning. By considering the three research-backed strategies below, parents and educators can help children succeed both inside and outside the classroom during this transition and throughout the school year.

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Use control strategies to meet family goals:

With the share of […]

By | September 8th, 2016|

An Evidence-Based Approach Can Put An End To Bullying

The Roman playwright Terence once said, “I am human, and nothing of that which is human is alien to me.”

If everyone shared and behaved according to this empathetic belief, bullying certainly wouldn’t be as prevalent as it is. With 14 per cent of U.S. students (PDF) reporting being bullied and five per cent bullying others in 2014, bullying is a regular affair both inside and outside schools.

It is the intent to gain power over another person that defines bullying behavior. Though children may use the word “bully” to describe certain interactions with their peers, it is the perception of power imbalance that distinguishes bullying from conflict. Conflict can be healthy, bullying can’t.

Recognizing bullying can be difficult, however, especially in the digital landscape we find ourselves. While more overt forms of bullying that are physical (hitting, punching and kicking) and verbal (name-calling and taunting) in nature do still occur at school, bullying can now be much more covert.

In fact, relational bullying, undermining peer acceptance and friendships, and cyber-bullying (using electronic communication technology to harm others) may be more discrete, more common and just as harmful.

With the advent of young people having access to devices that allow them to connect with each […]

By | March 1st, 2016|

How the Wealthy are Disadvantaged

Some things only money can buy — better access to education, health care, and security, not to mention iPhones, BMWs and exotic vacations.

However there is one vitally important thing that money cannot buy. There is mounting science of how the wealthy are disadvantaged in one area that may mean more to them than anything else — the fundamentals of their children’s health.

An Economist cover story claimed that to be successful in America’s new “meritocracy,” one must increasingly come from the elite. Not long after, The New York Times’ posted an article on exhausted super kids, and TIME magazine covered the shocking rise of the college mental health crisis in the pressure to be perfect. One thing all of these stories missed is that a disproportionate number of emotional, behavioural, and mental health problems are occurring in children of the upper class and upper middle class.

That is, wealth is now a risk factor.

Mental Health Symptoms:

In studies of upper class and upper middle class high school students across America, serious levels of depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, loneliness, and […]

By | December 9th, 2015|
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