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Books & Blogs2017-11-26T16:00:44+00:00

The Dolphin Parent

The Self-Motivated Kid

The Dolphin Way

Chinese Edition

With insight, professional expertise and unfailing instinct, Dr. Shimi Kang offers us essential guidance in restoring sanity to 21st Century parenting. Compassionate to parent and child, loving and reasoned in its approach, The Dolphin Way™ is highly readable, emotionally nurturing and intellectually satisfying

Gabor Mate M.D., Co-Author, Hold On To Your Kids: Why Parents Need To Matter More Than Peers

“This is a powerful book that not only reminds us of what it means to live a balanced human life, but also how to achieve it–simply and naturally. The Dolphin Way™ guides us towards balance in an often imbalanced world.”

David Suzuki

Ready to give your kids back their childhood—the part YOU loved? The joy? The creativity? The afternoons you still remember with such longing? If you’re driving your kid to the lessons neither of you likes, instead of giving yourselves BOTH a chance to relax, play or just ‘waste’ time, it’s time to turn around the car. This book is your U-turn to joy

Lenore Skenazy, founder of the book and blog Free-Range Kids

“In The Dolphin Way™, Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of THE WONDER OF BOYS and THE WONDER OF GIRLS

“The Dolphin Way™ is a beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself. It is full of compelling case histories and common-sense prescriptions for parenting in today’s world. Although Dr. Kang and I don’t agree on everything, we agree on most of what is in this book.”

Peter Gray, research professor of psychology, Boston College, and author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their their internal motivation and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult work – read this book! Using concrete evidence, Dr. Kang shows why “Tiger” approaches to parenting do more harm than good. Her Dolphin approach will have you and your kids cheering. Highly recommended!

Amy McCready, Founder of PositiveParentingSolutions.com and author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time...The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling

“What a wonderful contribution to the emerging evolution of conscious parenting! An encyclopedia of research and insights to help parents navigate their parenting journeys!”

Dr. Shefali Tsabary, author of The Conscious Parent and Out of Control

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Your Content Goes Here, Library Journal (starred review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

“This book really opened my eyes to the idea that balance in parenting is as important as balance in life. Dr. Kang uses evidence-based research to make her points about the importance of being an authoritative parent. I feel like this book has made me understand much better the kind of parent that I want to be and I know that it will very dog-eared from all my referencing as my son grows up.”

Your Content Goes Here, SavvyMom.ca

Dr. Shimi Kang writes insightfully of the real lives of parents, weaving science with spirit, and embedding highly practical suggestions into every chapter. I highly recommend this book!”

Michael Gurian, Author of The Wonder of Boys and The Wonder of Girls

A beautifully written guide that will help parents counteract the social forces that have been depriving children ever more of freedom, play, and childhood itself.”

Peter Gray, Author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life

“If you’re looking for effective but practical strategies to calm the chaos in your kids’ lives, foster their internal motivation, and truly prepare them to function successfully in the adult world—read this book!”

“Combining scientific research with personal stories, Kang has a soothing and encouraging tone that will appeal to many readers. By encouraging parents to model dolphins, who instruct by play, exploration, social bonds, altruism, contribution, and family and community values, kids will strengthen their own internal compass and have a stronger core with a greater chance at personal success and happiness.”

Library Journal, (Starred Review)

“Taking both an intimate look at herself and a broad lens to human hard-wiring, [Dr. Shimi Kang] provides a direly needed paradigm shift for child-rearing in the twenty-first century.”

Marlaine Cover, Founder, Parenting 2.0

Blog

How do we nurture adaptability, resilience and self-motivation in our children?

Laura was a first year university student when I met her in the hospital emergency room. She had slashed up her arms with the bow of her violin. She told me it was not a suicide attempt, but rather an act of desperation to cope with her feelings of exhaustion and anxiety. As a child, Laura was a star student excelling in academics and music, and she spent a lot of time in those activities. Laura’s mother solved many of her problems for her and protected her from everyday stresses, such as doing chores, because she didn’t want to interfere with Laura’s success in winning awards and medals. Things changed around the age of 16, when Laura began to have trouble with a curriculum that required critical thinking, creativity and collaborative group projects. Once in university, things became much worse and Laura admitted to me that she slashed her arms after she cheated in an English assignment that she was at risk of failing.

 

By |April 22nd, 2015|

Stress Is Wreaking Havoc on Women and Their Bodies

In honour of April’s Stress Awareness month, I wanted to take this time to touch upon a subject that many women of the 21st century are struggling with in silence, day after day, whether they are aware of it or not. During this month, many experts in all fields of health will come together in hopes of spreading awareness and increasing public understanding of this growing issue that is seemingly harmless and often overlooked. Because for many of us, we may not realize its creeping effects on our health until we fall extremely ill, or it is too late.

And in an increasingly complex and competitive world where studies have shown that women are more affected by this today and in bigger numbers than ever before in history, we need to ask ourselves when is enough, enough? And what can we do about it?

Just less than 200 years ago, the biggest trials women were faced with were that of fighting for their fundamental civil rights. The right to vote, attend university, a pension, play contact sports, earn minimum wage, and the list goes on. Today, despite being the closest we have ever been to equality in North American history, women are […]

By |April 10th, 2015|

Stress and the Gender Gap

In honour of April’s Stress Awareness month, I wanted to take this time to touch upon a subject that many women of the 21st century are struggling with in silence, day after day, whether they are aware of it or not. During this month, many experts in all fields of health will come together in hopes of spreading awareness and increasing public understanding of this growing issue that is seemingly harmless and often overlooked. Because for many of us, we may not realize its creeping effects on our health until we fall extremely ill, or it is too late. And in an increasingly complex and competitive world where studies have shown that women are more affected by this today and in bigger numbers than ever before in history, we need to ask ourselves when is enough, enough? And what can we do about it?

Just less than 200 years ago, the biggest trials women were faced with were that of fighting for their fundamental civil rights. The right to vote, attend university, a pension, play contact sports, earn minimum wage, and the list goes on. Today, despite being the closest we have ever been to equality in North American history, women […]

By |March 31st, 2015|

Workplace Bullying: A Real Issue That Needs a Real Solution

Tigertown is a pushing, demanding, and stifling workplace. The hours are long, the management is predatory, the employees are solitary, and there is little community — definitely no mentors, and no time for fun or collegial bonding. Tigertown is an incubator for an insidiously growing problem: workplace bullying.

Although school-based bullying in children and youth has achieved much attention over the years, adults bully all the time and in surprising places. Universities, hospitals, schools, corporations, and even the police force are all settings where the real, common, and shockingly increasing problem of workplace bullying is occurring.

A new report by the Conference Board of Canada called Workplace Bullying Primer: What Is It and How to Deal With It describes the growing problem of workplace bullying.

As expected, the most common type of workplace bullying is "top-down" bullying where a superior bullies an employee. However, lateral (peer to peer) and bottom up (employee bullies superior) can certainly also occur. Perhaps one surprising (or not so surprising) finding is that the major means of workplace bullying is email. Email is ubiquitous but it can be a feeding ground for nastiness. Bosses can send demanding emails to their subordinates late at night, colleagues can "forget to […]

By |February 25th, 2015|

Why Immigrant Kids Excel: They are NOT Tiger Parented

Let’s be serious. Most immigrant parents do not have the time, money, resources, or will to be over-controlling, hovering, tiger parents. As the child of immigrant parents from India, I find it hard to sit quiet while the intelligence, commitment, life experiences and core values of hardworking immigrant parents are bypassed, and the credit for their children’s success is given to an overbearing parenting style, or forced into an elusive “Triple Package” of neurotic combinations (a superiority complex, insecurity and impulse control) as suggested by Amy Chua’s book, of the same name and co-written with her husband Jed Rubenstein. The Economist, New York Times and other media have all brought attention to an achievement gap that can exist among some children of immigrants and other children. However, identifying the reason for this occurrence as being “The Revenge of the Tiger Mom”, as the Economist magazine dubbed it, is a gross oversimplification of a complex set of factors. In fact, the hyper-competitive, over-instructing, “all about me” Tiger parent is the exact opposite of what leads immigrant kids to succeed. Here is why.

Kids of Tiger Parents Don’t Always Excel
Su Yeong Kim, an associate professor at the University of Texas, followed more […]

By |February 19th, 2015|
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